Articles and Media

GCOSW Board of Directors Meeting Notes

January 24, 2017 at 5:30p.m.
2100 NW 53rd Ave. Suite A (Peaceful Paths).
Present were Taraneh Darabi, Victoria Condor-Williams, Kristy Sasser, Molly McGowan and Chuck Dale

5:30 P.M. Introductions/Sign-In
5:35 P.M. Calendar for year (attached)

Updates on:
1. Treasurer’s Report –
a. Current Balance – $7683.34

2. Reports:
a. Education Committee- Victoria Condor-Williams
i. Women’s History Month Awards Reception- just received the date confirmation for Women’s History Month Awards Reception, it will held at University House on Wednesday, March 1, 5:30 – 7:00pm
ii. Nomination Form – Deadline for nomination for the Elizabeth Cady Stanton/Ida B. Wells awards is January 30th, 2017. Nomination form attached. Please feel free to contact Victoria at 352-378-9787 if you have any questions.
iii. Motion to pay for award plaques, motion to approve by Victoria, unanimous in favor (Taraneh, Molly, Kristy and Victoria), cost to be billed through Trophy Shop for approximately $70.00
iv. Next Meeting: Thursday, February 2 @ 5:30pm @ 4510 NW 14th Place (Suburban Heights Subdivision)
b. Social Action/Media Committee-
i. Conference Committee- OVC TTAC is helping with the keynote and a workshop (including travel) at no charge. This is a huge help to the budget. Thank you members of the committee!
ii. Survivor’s Art Exhibit Committee- Meeting regularly and have space planned.

3. Project Ideas for year-
a. 2017 Women’s Day at the Capitol: March 29th &30th – Bella is going information is available at http://fcsw.net/resources/contact-us/activities-and-events/2016womens-day-at-the-capitol/
b. GED Tutoring- Peaceful Paths is looking to start more client education and social activities, one of which is GED tutoring, maybe we could help? Just an idea, we can discuss at the next meeting.

4. New Business-
a. Passing of Polly Doughty on 1/18/2017 who was a long-term community member who supported many causes along with her husband Paul. No arrangements have been announced yet. It was asked that we put an acknowledgement of her service on the website and make a dedication at the Women’s History Awards ceremony.
b. Latina Women’s League- Bronze Sponsorship ($300.00 same as last year) for film festival. Motion to approve by Victoria, unanimous in favor (Taraneh, Molly, Kristy and Victoria)

5. Items of interest attached:
a. Florida Commission 2016 Report
b. Cardiovascular Technology flier for free testing

6. Next Meeting- February 20th, 2017
Adjourned 6:25PM

FCOSW 2016
2017GCOSW_Nomination for Elizabeth Cady Stanton_Ida B. Wells Awards (2)

How Suffragists Used Cookbooks As A Recipe For Subversion

NINA MARTYRIS- NPR

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In the Meryl Streep period movie Suffragette, Englishwomen march on the streets, smash shop windows and stage sit-ins to demand the vote. Less well-known is that across the pond, a less cinematic resistance was being staged via that most humble vehicle: the cookbook.

Between 1886, when the first American suffragist cookbook was published, and 1920, when the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution granted women the right to vote, there were at least a half-dozen cookbooks published by suffragette associations in the country.

These books were the descendants of the post-Civil War charity cookbooks, published to raise funds for war victims and church-related issues.

Read more  here at NPR

 

Citizenship Workshop

MARK YOUR CALENDARS & HELP US SPREAD THE WORD!

ARE YOU READY TO BECOME A U.S. CITIZEN?

Receive FREE legal assistance on your application

FREE CITIZENSHIP WORKSHOP

Sunday, June 12 & 26

3:00pm- 6:00pm

St.  Augustine Catholic Church

1738 W University Ave, Gainesville, FL 32603

Info: 352-222-6601

Please contact to register to: castrolrg@gmail.com

**********

ESTAS PREPARADO PARA VOLVERTE CIUDADANO DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS?

Reciba ayuda legal gratis con su aplicación

TALLER DE CIUDADANIA GRATIS

Domingo, 12 de Junio & 26 de Junio

3:00pm- 6:00pm

Iglesia Católica San Agustín

1738 W University Ave, Gainesville, FL 32603

                                           Información: castrolrg@gmail.com o 352-222-6601

Para registrarse: Llame al 352-372-3533, ext. 110

THIS EVENT IS MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE SUPPORT OF LATINA WOMEN’S LEAGUE, Saint Augustine Church, UF Hispanic-Latino Affairs, Hispanic Advisory Council, St. Augustine Catholic Church, David Stoller Immigration Lawyers,  Immigration Law Office of Yomayra Vallejo PLLC

FREE-CITIZENSHIP-WORKSHOP_1

A Sheriff And A Doctor Team Up To Map Childhood Trauma

This is a wonderful article on two women who looked at and found areas of need in our county and did something about it. By finding that both the rates of child abuse, poverty and crime were concentrated in one area with no resources, they set about to change that. Through them came the initiative for the SWAG (Southwest Advocacy Group) Family Resource Center, along with help from many other people and groups. Now run by an independent board, it is a grassroots organization whose goal is to address the needs of the community by connecting individuals and families to services and resources through advocacy and from agency and community partners.

Thank you to Dr. Nancy Hardt and Sheriff Sadie Darnell for working to make our county a better place for children and families.

Please read and listen. 

Read more about SWAG here.

Annual Conference

Our GCOSW Conference was a wonderful day of good programs and speakers, much Thanks to everyone who worked so hard on it. More information will be added soon about the speakers and issues.

If you have feedback, please email to gcosw.org@gmail.com

 

FeaturedWelcome!

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Welcome to our website! We are happy to provide information for other users interested in the Gainesville Commission on the Status of Women and assorted activities we are involved in. To find specific information, there is a search panel on the right and you can go through the archives. E-mail if you have questions, please be patient as we all have other jobs and don’t always check the email daily. Thank you!

Myth of Equality in the Workplace

CEDAW Update

“The Myth of Equality in the U.S. Workplace”
This article appeared in Huffington Post. Read here

By JoAnn Kamuf Ward & Hillary Scrivani

Despite the United States’ array of legal protections, women continue to face barriers to equality and the full enjoyment of their human rights.

Currently, the U.S. is the only industrialized country that fails to ensure workers are provided paid parental leave. As a result, only 12 per cent of the private sector workforce is eligible for paid family leave, offered voluntarily by their employer. Yes, that means the majority of working women do not have access to paid family leave when they have a baby. This has real and tangible psychological, physical, emotional, and economic consequences.

Human rights call for equal pay for men and women; for maternity leave with pay; for policies that enable parents to balance family obligations with work responsibilities; as well as for special workplace protections for pregnant women. These protections are laid out in the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women, a treaty on women’s rights, also known as CEDAW. International human rights experts have also specifically called on the U.S. to introduce paid parental leave and to address the pay gap.

There is cause for optimism that the U.S. is moving in the right direction. In the absence of federal movement on paid family leave, paid sick time, and pregnancy accommodations, three U.S. states, namely New Jersey, California and Rhode Island have enacted legislation requiring employers to provide paid family leave insurance to their workers. Four states, Connecticut, California, Massachusetts and Oregon, the District of Columbia, and twenty localities now have paid sick time laws insuring a minimal amount of paid sick time to most workers. Additionally, sixteen states, the District of Columbia, and four localities have protections that offer at least some accommodations for pregnant workers.

These are positive steps, but further action is needed at the state and federal levels. Federal legislation that has been introduced such as the Paycheck Fairness Act, the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, the Schedules that Work Act, the FAMILY Act, and the Healthy Families Act would contribute to improving gender equality in the workplace and prove better support for families. If enacted, these laws would bring the U.S. much closer to human rights standards for fair treatment in the workplace.
Grounding our thinking about gender equality in human rights terms offers us a framework to shape the types of laws that will better protect women, children, and families.